5 Ways to Upgrade Your Race Car For Under $250

5 Ways to Upgrade Your Race Car For Under $250

The powerglide is the most popular drag racing transmission for many reasons: it's lightweight, affordable, and reliable (as long as it has the correct components!). A junkyard powerglide core with the factory 1.76 planetary gear set can be safe to almost 850 horsepower in lightweight cars with just a few upgrades.
Here's our list of the five best upgrades under $250:
 
This is a must have, since you'll need this to bolt up an aftermarket shifter. Customizing is easy, since our shift arm has holes drilled for the most popular shifter configurations. In addition, our two-piece design allows the arm to be placed in upper or lower position for rear or front entry shifters.
The band adjustment screw or pin in the OEM powerglide wasn't designed to take the power race engines produce today. Under heavy pressure, it can bend or break, causing a band failure. Our upgraded design is made from heat-treated 4340 steel, so it won't break or distort under any pressure levels.
The powerglide clutch hub is a critical upgrade in any application above 450 horsepower. The factory piece is a weak cast hub, but our forged hub is extremely durable and can accommodate up to eight friction and steel clutches when used with the correct piston in most powerglide drums.
Powerglide band failures are often attributed to problems in the servo, because a leak between circuits can cause application problems in the band. This two-ring servo drastically improves the seal, and it's made from high-quality 6061-T6 aluminum, so it's more durable than the factory cast piece. While there are more exotic servo options available, most racers don't need those features, and it's why this type remains the most popular.
In a racing powerglide, the soft parts are just as important as the hard ones! New technology in seals, clutches, and bushings have really improved the powerglide's reliability. This kit contains a quality band, friction and steel clutches, seals, gaskets, and a new filter.
Posted by Amber Ambrose at 11:30 AM